Chippewa Harbor to Thunder Bay

We spent four magnificent nights at anchor in Chippewa Harbor. A storm was brewing, so late Sunday afternoon we moved to a wider area of the basin for better protection from the 45-knot winds in the forecast. We had room to swing in all directions and to let out copious amounts of scope. Monday was a day of rain, thunder, lightning and howling winds as the storm passed through. Arkansas Traveler danced through multiple wide arcs but she did not budge her anchor.  We ate well.

The last meal from the trout: rolled in panko and crushed vinegar & salt potato chips; baked at 350 degrees until just slightly flaked

The last meal from the trout: here prepared for the oven, rolled in panko and crushed vinegar & salt potato chips; baked at 350 degrees until just slightly flaked

On Tuesday we took a long dinghy ride, discovering a well-camouflaged beaver lodge that had been right in front of us for two days. It was easy to see once we went behind it, but truly invisible from the lake. Cagey.

Beaver lodge in Chippewa Harbor

Beaver lodge in Chippewa Harbor

Wednesday morning was calm and clear. Bob raised the anchor at 0530 and we left with Passage Island as our destination.   The sun was bright and shining directly in our eyes as we slowly eased through the narrow S-channel towards the open lake. We were getting a bit to starboard of our GPS entry track and Bob steered to port to get back on track. Through the turn, the stern veered out to starboard and our propeller hit a submerged rock with a loud crash. The engine stalled.

She started right up when I went below and hit the start button. We very slowly powered forward until we entered the lake. There, in open water, we increased the RPMs and discovered a violent vibration. The entire boat strongly objected to the new bend in the prop. It would be a long, slow cruise to civilization. Thunder Bay, Ontario was the closest port with the needed equipment and expertise to haul the boat and pull the prop. If we kept the engine below 1400 RPMs (about 7 MPH), the vibration was tenable; anything faster could cause extensive damage across the drive train.

We were not quite ready to leave Isle Royale, but the day was perfect for a passage.

Isle Royale receding astern.  We were not quite ready to leave, but the day was perfect for a passage.

Overtaken by a laker in Thunder Bay

Overtaken by a laker in Thunder Bay

 

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2 Responses to Chippewa Harbor to Thunder Bay

  1. tomb215 says:

    Sorry to hear about the mishap. Guess you made it to the yard OK. I’m sure you’ll know to have them check the engine and shaft alignment. Sometimes if the hit is solid enough to stall the engine it can cause the engine to more ever so slightly on its mounting blocks as well as twisting the shaft.
    Margeret and I had that trouble when we got outside of a channel in the ICW. Had to have the shaft checked for a possible bend and the prop repaired and rebalanced. We were lucky because we were close to Mobile and a shop that had done some prop work for me years back.
    Have you found out how long it will take?

  2. ann jones says:

    Perfect last meal.

    Damn rock.

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